Update to lita-activedirectory

I updated our Active Directory lita plugin today with support for querying the members of a given group. See https://github.com/knuedge/lita-activedirectory. It still needs some work to properly present errors when a user or group doesn’t actually exist in the directory. Right now it returns nothing rather then a helpful error. It works splendidly with legit users and groups however.

ChatOps ftw!

Adventures in Ruby

I’m learning ruby. Finding time to work towards this goal is proving difficult but I’m forcing myself to use ruby wherever possible to aid in my learning. I’ll be putting some of my lame code on here to chronicle my learning and hopefully get some feedback on how I can improve things. I recently came across a good opportunity when I needed to generate a list of nodes to use with the puppet catalog preview tool

I wanted to get a full picture of my infrastructure and represent all our nodes in the report output without having to manually type a large node list. Puppet already has all my node names so I just need to extract them . My first step was to query the nodes endpoint in puppetdb for all nodes and pipe it into a file.

curl http://puppetdb.example.com:8080/v3/nodes/ > nodesout.txt

The output of this is json with an array of hashes.

[{
"name" : "server2.example.com",
"deactivated" : null,
"catalog_timestamp" : "2016-11-28T19:28:14.828Z",
"facts_timestamp" : "2016-11-28T19:28:12.112Z",
"report_timestamp" : "2016-11-28T19:28:13.443Z"
},{
"name" : "server.example.com",
"deactivated" : null,
"catalog_timestamp" : "2016-11-28T19:28:14.828Z",
"facts_timestamp" : "2016-11-28T19:28:12.112Z",
"report_timestamp" : "2016-11-28T19:28:13.443Z"
}]

I only want the name of each node so I need to parse that out. It was a great opportunity to open pry and get some practice!

  • load json so I can parse the file
[1] pry(main)> require 'json'
=> true
  • read in the file
[2] pry(main)> file = File.read('nodesout.txt')
  • parse the file into a variable
pry(main)> data_hash = JSON.parse(file)
=> [{"name"=>"server.example.com",
"deactivated"=>nil,
"catalog_timestamp"=>"2016-11-29T00:37:03.202Z",
"facts_timestamp"=>"2016-11-29T00:37:00.972Z",
"report_timestamp"=>"2016-11-29T00:36:38.679Z"},
{"name"=>"server2.example.com",
"deactivated"=>nil,
"catalog_timestamp"=>"2016-11-29T00:37:03.202Z",
"facts_timestamp"=>"2016-11-29T00:37:00.972Z",
"report_timestamp"=>"2016-11-29T00:36:38.679Z"}]
[4] pry(main)> data_hash.class
=> Array
  • setup a method to iterate over the data and write each hostname to a new line in a file
[5] pry(main)> def list_nodes(input)
[5] pry(main)*   File.open('nodes_out.txt', 'a') do |f|
[5] pry(main)*     input.each do |i|
[5] pry(main)*       f.puts i["name"]
[5] pry(main)*     end
[5] pry(main)*   end
[5] pry(main)* end
=> :list_nodes
  • run the method against my data_hash
[6] pry(main)> list_nodes(data_hash)
[7] pry(main)> exit

I now have the list of nodes I was looking for!

$ cat nodes_out.txt
server.example.com
server2.example.com

This accomplished what I needed and also saved me a lot of time (like putting the puppetdb query directly in the ruby stuff). I’m certain there may be a cleaner way to do this, but that’s what learning is for!